ACGG / Animal Breeding / Chickens / Genetics / ILRI / Indigenous Breeds / LiveGene / Livestock / LIVESTOCK-FISH / Poultry / Research / Staff / Tanzania

Voices on chicken genetics: Empowering women to benefit their families

Fadhili Guni is head of poultry unit at the Tanzania Livestock Research Institute (TALIRI). He introduces himself and his work in this one of a series of portraits of key people in the Africa Chicken Genetic Gains (ACGG) program.

Fedili Nuglina, head of poultry unit at the Tanzania livestock research instituteTell us about your education background?

I have a masters of science degree in tropical animal production, specifically poultry production, from Sokoine University of Agriculture in Tanzania, in which I focused on phenotypic characterization on the local chicken in the southern highlands of Tanzania. I joined TALIRI in 2008 and am currently leading the poultry unit.

This project matters because it’s helping to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers. I’m excited about seeing smallholder farmers growing, able to earn money to send their children to school, build their own houses and generally meet their needs. I hope the support from this program will help them in this way.

What is your work and what are you currently doing in ACGG?

I’m the sub-national coordinator for the ACGG program in the southern highlands of Tanzania. My main role is to coordinate and organize farmers there and explain ACCG’s activities to them so as to help to create awareness about the program. I also ensure the program is running smoothly in the area.

What are you focusing on right now within and also outside ACGG?

I want to know more about poultry so that I can better support smallholder poultry farmers in the southern highlands, and I’m also interested in increasing my writing and publishing.

Why does ACGG matter and what gets you excited about it?

This project matters because it’s helping to improve the livelihoods of smallholder farmers. I’m excited about seeing smallholder farmers growing, able to earn money to send their children to school, build their own houses and generally meet their needs. I hope the support from this program will help them in this way.

What challenges are you facing and how would you deal with them?

My main concern is improving people’s understanding of the program at village level. When we bring the program down to farmers, we want to make sure they understand how it’s going to help them. I believe that informing them about our activities, providing training on poultry management and explaining why we’re doing this work will, in time, help them see our support to them is for the good of the program.

What do you think will be the lasting impact of ACGG?

I think the lasting impact of ACGG will be in empowering women to benefit their whole families and improve their lives.

Any other thoughts?

We need to work hard as one team in all the program countries to succeed in what we have started.

One thought on “Voices on chicken genetics: Empowering women to benefit their families

  1. Go on Mr. Guni, when we talk about the small holders we talk about the mass, the needy who are struggling to improve their lively hood.

    Like

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